Michigan Institute of Plasma Science and EngineeringPlasma SciencePlasma EngineeringPlasma Science and Engineering

PSE SUPPORTING COURSES

Plasma Courses | Supporting Courses

AEROSP 532. Molecular Gas Dynamics
AEROSP 533 (ENSCEN 533). Combustion Processes
AOSS 479 (ENSCEN 479). Atmospheric Chemistry
AOSS 567 (CHEM 567). Chemical Kinetics
ASTRO 530. Stellar Astrophysics I: Star Formation and the Outer Layers of Stars
EECS 430 (AOSS 431). Radiowave Propagation and Link Design
EECS 503. Introduction to Numerical Electromagnetics
EECS 530 (APPPHYS 530). Electromagnetic Theory I
EECS 539 (APPPHYS 551) (PHYSICS 651). Lasers
EECS 587. Parallel Computing
EECS 633. Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics
MATH 571. Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing I
MATH 572. Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing II
MSE 489. Materials Processing Design
PHYSICS 405. Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism
PHYSICS 406. Statistical and Thermal Physics
PHYSICS 505. Electricity and Magnetism I
PHYSICS 506. Electricity and Magnetism II
PHYSICS 510. Statistical Physics I

SUPPORTING COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

AEROSP 532. Molecular Gas Dynamics
Prerequisite: permission of instructor. II (3 credits)
Analysis of basic gas properties at the molecular level. Kinetic theory: molecular collisions, the Boltzmann equation. Maxwellian distribution function. Quantum mechanics: the Schrodinger equation, quantum energy states for translation, rotation, vibration, and electronic models of atoms and molecules. Statistical mechanics: the Boltzmann relation, the Boltzmann energy distribution, partition functions. These ideas are combined for the analysis of a chemically reacting gas at the molecular level.

AEROSP 533 (ENSCEN 533). Combustion Processes
Prerequisite: AEROSP 225. (3 credits)
This course covers the fundamentals of combustion systems, and fire and explosion phenomena. Topics covered include thermochemistry, chemical kinetics, laminar flame propagation, detonations and explosions, flammability and ignition, spray combustion, and the use of computer techniques in combustion problems

AOSS 479 (ENSCEN 479). Atmospheric Chemistry
Prerequisite: CHEM 130, MATH 216. (4 credits)
Thermochemistry, photochemistry and chemical kinetics of the atmosphere; geochemical cycles, generation of atmospheric layers and effects of pollutants are discussed.

AEROSP 567 (CHEM 567). Chemical Kinetics
Prerequisite: CHEM 461 or AOSS 479. (3 credits)
A general course in chemical kinetics, useful for any branch of chemistry where reaction rates and mechanisms are important. Scope of subject matter: practical analysis of chemical reaction rates and mechanisms, theoretical concepts relating to gas and solution phase reactions.

ASTRO 530. Stellar Astrophysics I: Star Formation and the Outer Layers of Stars
(3 credits)
This course covers the assembly of stars and their protoplanetary disks from cold gas dust in the interstellar medium. Specific topics include fragmentation, disk dynamics, and jets. Radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and envelopes, essential to interpreting observations of stars and their environs, is addressed in the second part.

EECS 430 (AOSS 431). Radiowave Propagation and Link Design
Prerequisite: EECS 330 and senior standing or graduate standing. II (4 credits)
Fundamentals of electromagnetic wave propagation in the ionosphere, the troposphere, and near the Earth. Student teams will develop practical radio link designs and demonstrate critical technologies. Simple antennas, noise, diffraction, refraction, absorption, multi-path interference, and scattering are studied.

EECS 503. Introduction to Numerical Electromagnetics
Prerequisite: EECS 330. I (3 credits)
Introduction to numerical methods in electromagnetics including finite difference, finite element and integral equation methods for static, harmonic and time dependent fields; use of commercial software for analysis and design purposes; applications to open and shielded transmission lines, antennas, cavity resonances and scattering.

EECS 530 (APPPHYS 530). Electromagnetic Theory I
Prerequisite: EECS 330 or Physics 438. I (3 credits)
Maxwell's equations, constitutive relations and boundary conditions. Potentials and the representation of electromagnetic fields. Uniqueness, duality, equivalence, reciprocity and Babinet's theorems. Plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves. Waveguides and elementary antennas. The limiting case of electro- and magneto-statics.

EECS 539 (APPPHYS 551) (PHYSICS 651). Lasers
Prerequisite: EECS 537 and EECS 538. (3 credits)
Complete study of laser operation: the atom-field interaction; homogeneous and inhomogeneous broadening mechanisms; atomic rate equations; gain and saturation; laser oscillation; laser resonators, modes, and cavity equations; cavity modes; laser dynamics, Q-switching and modelocking. Special topics such as femto-seconds lasers and ultrahigh power lasers.

EECS 587. Parallel Computing
Prerequisite: EECS 281 and graduate standing. I (4 credits)
The development of programs for parallel computers. Basic concepts such as speedup, load balancing, latency, system taxonomies. Design of algorithms for idealized models. Programming on parallel systems such as shared or distributed memory machines, networks. Grid Computing. Performance analysis. Course includes a substantial term project.

EECS 633. Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics
Prerequisite: EECS 530. Alternate years (3 credits)
Numerical techniques for antennas and scattering; integral representation: solutions of integral equations: method of moments, Galerkin's technique, conjugate gradient FFT; finite element methods for 2-D and 3-D simulations; hybrid finite element/boundary integral methods; applications: wire, patch and planar arrays; scattering composite structures

MATH 571 - Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing I
Background and Goals: This course is a rigorous introduction to numerical linear algebra with applications to 2-point boundary value problems and the Laplace equation in two dimensions. Both theoretical and computational aspects of the subject are discussed. Some of the homework problems require computer programming. Students should have a strong background in linear algebra and calculus, and some programming experience. This course is a core course for the Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics (AIM) graduate program. Content: The topics covered usually include direct and iterative methods for solving systems of linear equations: Gaussian elimination, Cholesky decomposition, Jacobi iteration, Gauss-Seidel iteration, the SOR method, an introduction to the multigrid method, conjugate gradient method; finite element and difference discretizations of boundary value problems for the Poisson equation in one and two dimensions; numerical methods for computing eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Alternatives: Math 471 (Intro to Numerical Methods) is a survey course in numerical methods at a more elementary level. Subsequent Courses: Math 572 (Numer Meth for Sci Comput II) covers initial value problems for ordinary and partial differential equations. Math 571 and 572 may be taken in either order. Math 671 (Analysis of Numerical Methods I) is an advanced course in numerical analysis with varying topics chosen by the instructor.

MATH 572 - Numerical Methods for Scientific Computing II
Background and Goals: This is one of the basic courses for students beginning study towards the Ph.D. degree in mathematics. Graduate students from engineering and science departments and strong undergraduates are also welcome. The course is an introduction to numerical methods for solving ordinary differential equations and hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations. Fundamental concepts and methods of analysis are emphasized. Students should have a strong background in linear algebra and analysis, and some experience with computer programming. This course is a core course for the Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics (AIM) graduate program. Content: Content varies somewhat with the instructor. Numerical methods for ordinary differential equations; Lax's equivalence theorem; finite difference and spectral methods for linear time dependent PDEs: diffusion equations, scalar first order hyperbolic equations, symmetric hyberbolic systems. Alternatives: There is no real alternative; MATH 471 (Intro to Numerical Methods) covers a small part of the same material at a lower level. MATH 571 and 572 may be taken in either order. Subsequent Courses: MATH 671 (Analysis of Numerical Methods I) is an advanced course in numerical analysis with varying topics chosen by the instructor.

MSE 489. Materials Processing Design

PHYSICS 405 - Intermediate Electricity and Magnetism

PHYSICS 406 - Statistical and Thermal Physics
Introduction to thermal processes including the classical laws of thermodynamics and their statistical foundations: basic probability concepts; statistical description of systems of particles; thermal interaction; microscopic basis of macroscopic concepts such as temperature and entropy; the laws of thermodynamics; and the elementary kinetic theory of transport processes.

PHYSICS 505 - Electricity and Magnetism I
Electrostatics, time-independent magnetic phenomena, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, free electromagnetic fields, covariant formalism of electrodynamics, scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves, wave guides, radiating systems, radiation from moving charges

PHYSICS 506 - Electricity and Magnetism II
Electrostatics, time-independent magnetic phenomena, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, free electromagnetic fields, covariant formalism of electrodynamics, scattering and diffraction of electromagnetic waves, wave guides, radiating systems, radiation from moving charges.

PHYSICS 510 - Statistical Physics I
Review of thermodynamics, statistical bases of second law, entropy and irreversibility, equipartition, the Gibbs paradox. Quantum statistics, ideal Fermi gas, ideal Bose gas, Bose-Einstein condensation, phase equilibrium, phase transitions, fluctuations and transport theory.